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Intro


Beautiful Creatures of the Deep
As a result of current pollution, toxins, especially from that of agricultural waste, are strong by the shorelines where many sharks roam. These toxins become more concentrated up the food chain as one fish eats another. With sharks as the apex predator, toxin poisoning becomes a major concern.  All profits go to help efforts to save sharks.

Join My Blog!      Contact Me   Purchase Products    Purchase My Book

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Intro


Beautiful Creatures of the Deep
As a result of current pollution, toxins, especially from that of agricultural waste, are strong by the shorelines where many sharks roam. These toxins become more concentrated up the food chain as one fish eats another. With sharks as the apex predator, toxin poisoning becomes a major concern.  All profits go to help efforts to save sharks.

Join My Blog!      Contact Me   Purchase Products    Purchase My Book

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About


 

 

 

Alexandra DiGiacomo
As a child, from minnows to manatees, I was intrigued by the underwater world. Having spent summers on the East End of Long Island and family vacations in Key Largo, I developed a tremendous love for the water.  My curiosity about marine life grew upon hearing Dr. Sylvia Earle speak at the Norwalk Aquarium in Connecticut.  After my freshman year, I studied marine conservation at the Oceanic Research Center in Belize where I first swam with and observed sharks. As a sophomore, I studied shark biology and dove with bull sharks for a month in the South Pacific. Now, I’m a seventeen year-old who has a peculiar fascination with sharks. Inspired to share my respect for these creatures and reveal the importance of keeping our oceans healthy, I began a blog, Saving Sharks for Safer Seas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About


 

 

 

Alexandra DiGiacomo
As a child, from minnows to manatees, I was intrigued by the underwater world. Having spent summers on the East End of Long Island and family vacations in Key Largo, I developed a tremendous love for the water.  My curiosity about marine life grew upon hearing Dr. Sylvia Earle speak at the Norwalk Aquarium in Connecticut.  After my freshman year, I studied marine conservation at the Oceanic Research Center in Belize where I first swam with and observed sharks. As a sophomore, I studied shark biology and dove with bull sharks for a month in the South Pacific. Now, I’m a seventeen year-old who has a peculiar fascination with sharks. Inspired to share my respect for these creatures and reveal the importance of keeping our oceans healthy, I began a blog, Saving Sharks for Safer Seas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Teaching


Teaching
When teaching shark anatomy and conservation to kindergartners, I saw my childhood fascination once again. As I passed around a real shark tooth, the kids looked up in awe and wonder. Instead of shuddering with fear, they raised their hands wanting to know more about these creatures. As we grow, it seems we begin to turn away from parts of our world. What we are taught to dislike, we dislike. What we are taught to love, we love. In preteen years, we are intrigued, not by sharks, but by the thrillers that vilify them. The stories of Shark Week and movies like Jaws are often over-dramatized for effect, they shape our outlook on sharks nonetheless. Thus, at a very tender and formative time in one’s life, biases against sharks become engrained in us.

 

 

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Teaching


Teaching
When teaching shark anatomy and conservation to kindergartners, I saw my childhood fascination once again. As I passed around a real shark tooth, the kids looked up in awe and wonder. Instead of shuddering with fear, they raised their hands wanting to know more about these creatures. As we grow, it seems we begin to turn away from parts of our world. What we are taught to dislike, we dislike. What we are taught to love, we love. In preteen years, we are intrigued, not by sharks, but by the thrillers that vilify them. The stories of Shark Week and movies like Jaws are often over-dramatized for effect, they shape our outlook on sharks nonetheless. Thus, at a very tender and formative time in one’s life, biases against sharks become engrained in us.

 

 

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Book


Children's Book

By writing a children’s book, I hope to dispel the negative myths surrounding sharks early. I also hope to motivate young children to develop a familiarity with sharks and inspire them to become future advocates for the protection of our ocean! One long year ago, I wrote the initial manuscript for A Familiar Fin. After rounds and rounds of editing and revising, a fellow classmate of my high school, Dhruv Singh, drew beautiful illustrations to bring this book to life. Each book bought supports Sharks4Kids, an important organization encouraging awareness and action for young children.

DiGiacomo is shown here teaching at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge

All the profits from A Familiar Fin are donated to Sharks4Kids. Buy a copy for yourself, your children or your classroom!

A Familiar Fin: Buy A Copy to Support Sharks Worldwide

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Book


Children's Book

By writing a children’s book, I hope to dispel the negative myths surrounding sharks early. I also hope to motivate young children to develop a familiarity with sharks and inspire them to become future advocates for the protection of our ocean! One long year ago, I wrote the initial manuscript for A Familiar Fin. After rounds and rounds of editing and revising, a fellow classmate of my high school, Dhruv Singh, drew beautiful illustrations to bring this book to life. Each book bought supports Sharks4Kids, an important organization encouraging awareness and action for young children.

DiGiacomo is shown here teaching at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge

All the profits from A Familiar Fin are donated to Sharks4Kids. Buy a copy for yourself, your children or your classroom!

A Familiar Fin: Buy A Copy to Support Sharks Worldwide

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Inspiration


Inspired
Moved by Dr. Sylvia's Book, The World is Blue, I felt compelled to take action. In Belize, I worked with a classmate to create a documentary-style video stressing the ecological and economical importance of the Mesoamerican reef and urged the need for greater protection. Here, we had the great fortune to meet and interview Dr. Sylvia Earle. I was also deeply inspired by Mission 31, and to meet Fabien Cousteau, at the Norwalk Maritime Aquarium in Connecticut.

 

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Inspiration


Inspired
Moved by Dr. Sylvia's Book, The World is Blue, I felt compelled to take action. In Belize, I worked with a classmate to create a documentary-style video stressing the ecological and economical importance of the Mesoamerican reef and urged the need for greater protection. Here, we had the great fortune to meet and interview Dr. Sylvia Earle. I was also deeply inspired by Mission 31, and to meet Fabien Cousteau, at the Norwalk Maritime Aquarium in Connecticut.

 

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Blog


"Sharks are beautiful animals, and if you're lucky enough to see lots of them, that means that you're in a healthy ocean. You should be afraid if you are in the ocean and don't see sharks." -Dr. Sylvia Earle  ...The first step towards protecting our oceans is awareness. With education, we can build support and initiate change. I blog every week to share my respect for these amazing creatures and reveal the importance of keeping our oceans healthy.

Please join me in this effort!

 

 

Join My Blog!          Contact Me       Follow me on Twitter

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Blog


"Sharks are beautiful animals, and if you're lucky enough to see lots of them, that means that you're in a healthy ocean. You should be afraid if you are in the ocean and don't see sharks." -Dr. Sylvia Earle  ...The first step towards protecting our oceans is awareness. With education, we can build support and initiate change. I blog every week to share my respect for these amazing creatures and reveal the importance of keeping our oceans healthy.

Please join me in this effort!

 

 

Join My Blog!          Contact Me       Follow me on Twitter

My photos


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My photos


Underwater photos on this site were taken by Alexandra DiGiacomo (cageless) using a GoPro

Alexandra has earned college credit in Shark Biology and has been acknowledged in Fisheries Vol. 41 essay: "Defining Forage Species to Prevent a Management Dilemma." She has interned as a summer high school student at the Shinnecock Bay Restoration Program, Stony Brook University Southampton School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences Lab.

Alexandra has earned dive certifications including Rescue Diver, Advanced Open Water, Search & Recovery, Emergency First Responder, AWARE Shark Conservation, Underwater Navigator, Fish ID, Emergency Oxygen Provider, and Underwater Naturalist. She is a Junior Shark Ambassador at Sharks4Kids. Alexandra is now preparing to become a shark tank diver this spring at the Norwalk Maritime Aquarium in Connecticut.

Alexandra is a senior at Ridgefield High School in Connecticut, a National Merit Scholar, has received the President’s Volunteer Service Award in 2013. 2014, and 2015, Water Quality Medal in the Science Olympiad, and The Gold Award: the highest award in Scouting. Her hobbies include musical theater, captain of two a cappella groups, madrigals, dance, and mock trial.

Alexandra will attend Duke University at an Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholar in the Fall of 2016. She has started her own line of ocean-inspired tapestries. pillows, and tee shirts, website soon to follow.

As I swam through the dark path of an underwater cave, I reached the opening and took this shot of fan coral waving in the “breeze” of the currents: Soft Coral Dive, Fiji

As I swam through the dark path of an underwater cave, I reached the opening and took this shot of fan coral waving in the “breeze” of the currents: Soft Coral Dive, Fiji

Diving with beautiful creatures in Fiji.  Shark video and photos by Alexandra  DiGiacomo (cageless) using a GoPro

Diving in a healthy ocean, Fiji

Diving in a healthy ocean, Fiji

Blue Hole, an underwater vertical cave

Blue Hole, an underwater vertical cave

Our dive team, photo by team leader

Our dive team, photo by team leader


At the Shinnecock Bay Restoration Program, Stony Brook University Southampton School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences Lab

At the Shinnecock Bay Restoration Program, Stony Brook University Southampton School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences Lab

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Illustrations by fellow Ridgefield High School Student, Dhruv Singh

Author Alexandra E DiGiacomo

Author Alexandra E DiGiacomo

Illustrations by fellow Ridgefield High School Student, Dhruv Singh



Blacktip shark adopted to support Bimini Shark Lab! Photo by Bimini Shark Lab


Measuring a Loggerhead in Greece, Summer 2016

Measuring a Loggerhead in Greece, Summer 2016

Shark Diving Team, Summer 2016

Shark Diving Team, Summer 2016

all profits go to efforts to save sharks

Shark tank presentations at the Norwalk Maritime Aquarium, CT Summer 2016

Shark tank presentations at the Norwalk Maritime Aquarium, CT Summer 2016

Rescue Diver, Alexandra DiGiacomo, in her environment